Silverstone F1 ticket prices increase 238% in 5 years

Alex Gassman

by Alex Gassman

Silverstone f1 ticket prices

Despite selling out almost instantly, Silverstone F1 ticket prices are the most expensive they’ve ever been. 

This articles lists the Silverstone ticket prices over the last 10 years and looks at why they’re so high.

Plus we provide details on when Silverstone will release the F1 tickets and how to avoid the worst of the horrible dynamic pricing system.

Contents

Where to buy Silverstone tickets

The official place to purchase Silverstone F1 tickets is directly through the Silverstone website, or through Silverstone’s hospitality partner Match Hospitality for VIP tickets.

Silverstone specifically prohibits you from buying tickets through third party websites such as StubHub or Viagogo, and says that any tickets purchased through these resellers will be invalid.

That is the official line, read on further for some more info.

Silverstone F1 tickets dynamic pricing

For a number of years Silverstone’s ticket prices have increased the closer to the British Grand prix you purchased them. 

For the 2023 F1 event their dynamic pricing system introduced price rises every 90 seconds once they were first released for sale to the public. This saw huge price increases in a very short space of time.

Their website couldn’t cope with the number of users and people were sat in virtual queues for hours, only to find that when they did finally get through to purchase their ticket prices had risen significantly.

Silverstone Racing Club membership

One way to avoid the pain, chaos and mayhem of the public ticket release and horrible dynamic pricing was to pay for the Silverstone Racing Club membership.

This year membership costs £150 for the year. This gives you access to the priority (early-bird) ticket release, a few days ahead of the main public release. Full schedule of 2024 ticket releases can be found below. 

In 2023 most people who paid for the SRC membership found that it paid for itself by not being at the mercy of the same crazy price rises.

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It also gives you 10% off food and merchandise, plus free entry to a number of club events at Silverstone throughout the year.

It’s not yet certain whether Silverstone will again use their dynamic pricing for the 2024 British Grand Prix.

More details and info on purchasing a Silverstone Racing Club membership can be found here.

When are Silverstone tickets released

The image below shows the schedule of ticket releases for the 2024 British Grand Prix at Silverstone.

Silverstone F1 2024 priority tickets go on sale on the Monday 18th September 2023 at 10am to paid members of the Silverstone Racing Club.

The first public ticket sale for some grandstands and General Admission Plus takes place on Thursday 21st September at 11am.

Silverstone F1 General Admission tickets go on sale to the public at 11am on Monday 25th Sep

Silverstone F1 2024 ticket release schedule

Silverstone F1 ticket price rises

To look at how much the Silverstone F1 prices have risen, below is a comparison of the general admission ticket prices over the last 5 years. The 2023 prices are the current (as of time of publishing) ticket prices.

2023 Silverstone F1 ticket prices:

  • Friday: £169
  • Saturday: £209
  • Sunday: £299
  • 3-day weekend: £349

2022 Silverstone F1 ticket prices:

  • Friday: £129
  • Saturday: £179
  • Sunday: £279
  • 3-day weekend: £319

2021 Silverstone F1 ticket prices:

  • Friday: £99
  • Saturday: £149
  • Sunday: £185
  • 3-day weekend: £200

2020 Silverstone F1 ticket prices:

  • Friday: £79
  • Saturday: £109
  • Sunday: £175
  • 3-day weekend: £195

2019 Silverstone F1 ticket prices:

  • Friday: £50
  • Saturday: £95
  • Sunday: £140
  • 3-day weekend: £180

Here’s the change in tickets prices over the last 5 years on a handy little graph:

The prices have gone up a lot over the last 5 years. Let’s look at how much that is in percentage terms.

2019 to 2023 Silverstone F1 ticket price increase:

  • Friday: 238%
  • Saturday: 120%
  • Sunday: 77%
  • 3-day weekend: 84%

As a comparison, the Bank of England’s inflation calculator estimates an 11% price rise in the cost of everyday living, spending and goods from 2019 to 2023. A little lower than the ticket price rise!

For reference, the MotoGP Silverstone 2018 tickets cost just £55 for a Sunday ticket or £85 for a full weekend ticket.

Below is the data for the Silverstone F1 tickets prices over the last 10 years. The only time in that period prices have gone down was from 2015 to 2016, when Silverstone’s newly appointed MD made a concerted effort to reduce admission prices to bring more fans through the doors.

The Silverstone tickets do include access to the British Grand Prix concerts and musical performances, but the Mahiki after parties cost extra.

Why is Silverstone so expensive?

It’s understandable to see event prices increases year-on-year but the Silverstone tickets have become way more expensive in the last couple of years.

One of the main reasons Silverstone is now so expensive is due to the recent increase in popularity of Formula One. 

The Netflix documentary Drive to Survive has brought the drama, politics and on-track action to millions more people around the world. In addition, Formula 1’s owners Liberty Media have increased the sports’ social media presence massively, attracting a much younger crowd.

Drive to Survive on Netflix

In 2023 a record 400,000 plus spectators attended the British Grand Prix at Silverstone across the long weekend. The sport’s popularity increase has meant Silverstone has been upgrading its facilities, capacity and offering to fans.

There are new grandstands at Abbey, Luffield and Chapel corners, a new hotel on the Hamilton Straight, additional viewing areas and big TV screens for fans, more areas to camp at Silverstone

Plus there’s a whole host most catering, entertainment and hospitality options to make the F1 weekend feel more like a festival for the whole family. There’s also the recent Wing building and new pit lane and paddock areas to pay for.

All of this costs money. Add on to that the £20million each year Silverstone has to pay Formula One to host the race, and they have to try and make it back somewhere. 

Despite Silverstone’s owners the BRDC not making any profit from the F1 over the last 40 years, they are continually investing in the circuit. Unfortunately this hits us fans right in our wallets. 

Will Silverstone release additional tickets?

If you miss the first round of ticket releases there’s usually an additional release early in the new year.

You can sign up to their mailing list here where you’ll be notified a few days prior to any additional release. 

For the 2023 British Grand Prix there were some additional tickets available for purchase in April of that year.

Can I buy Silverstone tickets on the gate?

Silverstone F1 tickets must be purchased in advance, not on the gate. If they are sold out online do not turn up at the circuit in the hope you can buy some on the day as you will be turned away.

Buying through ticket resellers

Website such as StubHub and Viagogo list Silverstone F1 tickets for sale. These come with a couple of risks, the first of which is that Silverstone’s Ts&Cs say any tickets purchased through these kinds of third-party resellers are invalid. 

But online forums and groups suggest you can get away with it as Silverstone doesn’t check your ID on the gate.

Secondly, those websites often come with awful ratings and many reviews from people who received the wrong tickets, got their tickets too late, never received them at all or it turned it they were duplicated of other tickets, so weren’t valid. Choose this option at your peril.

If you are desperate for tickets after they have sold out, keep an eye on Twitter and Facebook groups for people selling their tickets who can no longer go to the event.

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Alex Gassman

I‘m Alex. I write F1 and motorsport travel guides based on my experience as racing driver and full-time motorsport nerd. I’ve traveled the world watching F1 and other racing series.

I started oversteer48 with the aim of helping other motorsport fans who are planning on watching some racing themselves.

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